The Offing - Fractured Fragments

The fragment – that white-spaced text – has been in vogue of late. From music critic Ted Gioia’s claim that “novels are falling to pieces” to Maggie Nelson revolutionizing the form with her prose-poem Bluets, and even to popular novels such as Cloud Atlas by David Mitchell, the fully evolved narrative seems to be giving way in favor of the defragmented and the disintegrated. 

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The Guardian US - PEN World Voices festival: what can novelists do to help the refugee crisis?

For the last five years the war in Syria has not only caused the deaths of 470,000 people, created eight million internally displaced citizens, and caused the exodus of another four million to other countries, it has brought the term “refugee crisis”into the global consciousness. But what exactly is a refugee crisis, how do we perceive it, and how can writers help us to see the humanity of the situation?

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The Guardian US - Class A books: PEN World Voices Festival opens with riffs on drugs

The 12th PEN World Voices festival opened last night at Cooper Union in New York City. The question of illegal drugs and the drug trade – why do they exist, why are we so obsessed with parallel realities, and if we find them, which is the more real? – was posed to eight writers from around the world, including Anne EnrightBoris Akunin and Marlon James.

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Washington Post - Voyage Le Corbusier by Jacob Brillhart

In his seminal work “Toward an Architecture” (1923), Le Corbusier compelled his contemporaries to forget the “kissing doves” of old architecture and embrace the beauty of the machinery and construction expanding before them. “May our eyes see,” he said, praising the innovative lines and structures of planes, ships and other transport vehicles.

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The Guardian UK - 'I don't feel like a Burundian - I am a refugee'

Ndayishimiye has been a refugee for so long that this state of being has come to define him more than his formal nationality. The 28-year-old is from Burundi, but for decades his family has been washed back and forth across porous borders by the waves of violence that regularly batter Africa’s Great Lakes region.

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Washington Post - The Trip by Deborah Davis

In the summer of 1963, Andy Warhol hopped into a Ford Falcon and drove from New York to Los Angeles. Then in his mid-30s, Warhol had accepted an offer by Dennis Hopper to throw a party in his honor. With an inkling that he wanted to develop his skills in film, the avant-garde artist and three of his friends — poet Gerard Malanga, filmmaker Taylor Mead and painter Wynn Chamberlain — set off on a wild 4 1/2- day excursion across the country.

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Washington Post - The Life and Death of Sophie Stark

Not long after the film “Blue is the Warmest Color” won the prestigious Palme d’Or at Cannes in 2013, the leading actressescame forward with the claim that the director had emotionally manipulated them during rehearsal. A similar scenario begins “The Life and Death of Sophie Stark,” Anna North’s novel about the morally complex world of making art.

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Los Angeles Times - Carolina de Robertis

 In "The Gods of Tango" (Alfred A. Knopf: 384 pp., $26.95), the third novel by Carolina de Robertis, a young girl named Leda takes a journey across the sea from the small Italian village of Alazzano to the pulsing city of Buenos Aires to marry her cousin, Dante. On hearing of her fiancé's death, Leda decides to distance herself from the restricted world of migrant women and dress as a man, seduced by the burgeoning tango scene.

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